OLLI

Event details

  • February 7, 2018
  • 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm
  • Epworth Room. Registration Required.

OLLI Lecture Series:

SPRING, 2018

Wednesday, Feb. 7, 2018, 3:30 p.m.

John Muir and Big Trees
Presenter: Michael Wurtz, Head of Holt-Atherton Special Collections Pacific Library

Naturalist John Muir may have come to California in 1868 to see the Giant Sequoia – the most massive trees in the world. At first, he reveled among the groves, then he studied them scientifically, and lastly he fought to preserve “the noblest of the noble race.” Learn more about his travels and discoveries as he visited the Calaveras Grove three times before it was a state park and used those visits to promote his ideas.

Registration is required. Contact the church office or OLLI@Pacific


Wednesday, Feb. 14, 2018, 3:30 p.m.

Pirates at Monterey: When Argentina Captured the Capital of California
Presenter: George Yagi, Instructor, University College

In 1818, the seat of royal power in Spanish California rested in the colonial capital of Monterey. While Argentina rebelled against rule from Madrid, a French born privateer from Buenos Aires named Hipólito Bouchard journeyed to the distant colony with the goal of igniting revolution and securing plunder. Supported by an international crew, which included a large contingent of Hawaiian natives, Bouchard attacked, captured, and burned Monterey. Learn more about this almost forgotten chapter in California history which addresses its brief period of Argentine rule.

Registration is required. Contact the church office or OLLI@Pacific


Wednesday, Feb. 21, 2018, 3:30 p.m.

Sex, Lies, and Cybercrimes
Presenter: Martin Maxwell, Visiting Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering

Professional criminals find new ways to commit old crimes, treating cybercrime like a business and forming global criminal communities. Media reports suggest the losses are in the billions.

In this lecture, we will look at recent security compromises, ways that they occurred, and what their real cost might be. As part of the cybercrime lecture, we will also look at sex and lies.

Registration is required. Contact the church office or OLLI@Pacific


Wednesday, Feb. 28, 2018, 3:30 p.m.

Myths and Realities about Memory and Aging (and What You Can Do!)
Presenter: Carla Strickland-Hughes, Assistant Professor Psychology

Would you like to learn what changes in memory are “typical” in adulthood? Are you interested in learning strategies you can use to enhance your memory in your everyday life? This presentation will dispel some of the “myths” about memory and aging. It will also provide some tools and skills for memory, starting with simple techniques so that everyone can benefit, even if they have very little background in memory.

Registration is required. Contact the church office or OLLI@Pacific


Wednesday, March 7, 2018, 3:30 p.m.

Urban Forestry to the Rescue in Stockton: Trees and Healthy Communities in America
Presenter: Gene Bigler, Retired Visiting Professor

Once celebrated as the best tree city in the West by Sunset magazine, the tree canopy of Stockton has fallen on hard times since the turn-of-the-century and played a significant role in the degradation of the city’s environment. PUENTES and five partner organizations recently inaugurated a campaign to revive the city’s tree canopy by getting the community to renew Arbor Day and other American tree care traditions that emphasize the importance of trees in defining the quality of life in American settlements since colonial times. The campaign emphasizes how the city of Stockton’s recovery from bankruptcy must go far beyond financial measures and anticipate the increasing challenge of climate change.

Registration is required. Contact the church office or OLLI@Pacific


Wednesday, March 14, 2018, 3:30 p.m.

Secret City – A History of the Navy at China Lake, Part I
Presenter: Helen Gross, OLLI Member

Secret City, the video, traces the history of China Lake from the 1943 founding of the Naval Ordnance Test Station through peace and war and through parties and politics. It covers the history of the area in the Mojave Desert and connections to many weapons installations all across the United States.

Helen Gross grew up in the shadow of the test station in a unique atmosphere of secrecy as to what was really happening on the base. Her father’s role in that installation was mostly unknown during the years she lived there. She will tell you her story and share the rich military history from the station that was hidden in the California desert, yet, known to all our cold war enemies. Part one of a two part lecture, with lots of information from
the past.

Registration is required. Contact the church office or OLLI@Pacific


Wednesday, March 21, 2018, 3:30 p.m.

Secret City – A History of the Navy at China Lake, Part II
Presenter: Helen Gross, OLLI Member

Secret City, the video, traces the history of China Lake from the 1943 founding of the Naval Ordnance Test Station through peace and war and through parties and politics. It covers the history of the area in the Mojave Desert and connections to many weapons installations all across the United States.

Helen Gross grew up in the shadow of the test station in a unique atmosphere of secrecy as to what was really happening on the base. Her father’s role in that installation was mostly unknown during the years she lived there. She will tell you her story and share the rich military history from the station that was hidden in the California desert, yet, known to all our cold war enemies. Part two of a two part lecture, with lots of information from
the past.

Registration is required. Contact the church office or OLLI@Pacific


Wednesday, March 28, 2018, 3:30 p.m.

Experiencing the Art of Rome, Part II
Presenter: Deanna Hunt, Adjunct Professor, Visual Arts

Be dazzled by the glorious artworks in Rome, viewed as if walking through the city. Rome is often called an outdoor museum. While the Vatican holds the
largest collection of art in the world, one can experience some of Rome’s greatest treasures walking through the center. Gain appreciation for the beauty, uniqueness and stylistic characteristics of these masterpieces of art and architecture.
Learn how the historical context, close proximity and location of the works in the city influenced their creation. Your guide, Deanna Hunt, who lived in Italy for ten years and has been leading tours to Italy for decades, will enlighten you about her “top ten” artworks…and perhaps even some locals’ tips.

Registration is required. Contact the church office or OLLI@Pacific


Wednesday, April 4, 2018, 3:30 p.m.

Remedies and Resources 2018: More Gratitude, Less Complaining
Presenter: Alexis Easton, Retired United Methodist Clergy and Interfaith Educator

Irritation infuses much of our communication these days. In this 2018 reality of anxiety and animosity, we need strategies that will strengthen efforts to build peaceful, productive communities. Two useful behaviors are to increase expressions of gratitude and reduce expressions of complaining. Being
grateful and expressing gratitude is a foundational aspect of spirituality and religion. Neuropsychology, media, and self-help tools exhort us to its practice.
Gratitude practice, however, is only one side of a complete picture; the other side is to decrease complaining. In these contentious times, an impulsive, pugnacious snit may go viral and be the subject of 48 hours of global animosity!
Our communications have impact. Learn simple strategies to increase gratitude and decrease complaining.

Registration is required. Contact the church office or OLLI@Pacific


Wednesday, April 11, 2018, 3:30 p.m.

The Tsar, The Cad, The Poet, and His Wife: Shame and Honor in Imperial Russia
Presenter: Jennifer Laam, St. Martin Press Author

Join author and Pacific alumna Jennifer Laam for a case study in historical scandal. Russia’s great poet, Alexander Pushkin, died tragically at the age of 37 after a duel to defend his wife’s honor. Both before and after the poet’s death, gossip mongers targeted his wife, Natalya. Had she kept another lover? Was she the tsar’s mistress? Did her careless flirtations put her husband’s life at risk? Jennifer will use the Pushkins’ story – featured in her new novel THE LOST SEASON OF LOVE AND SNOW – to discuss how contemporary views on gender politics and sexual harassment impact depictions of women in history.

Registration is required. Contact the church office or OLLI@Pacific


Wednesday, April 18, 2018, 3:30 p.m.

Corruption in America Part I: Two Centuries of Constitutional Ideals and Practical Politics
Presenter: Gene Bigler, Retired Visiting Professor

The potential for political corruption to undermine the new republic they were forming was by far the greatest fear of the Framers for the new Constitution they were creating. Sex and media scandals, foreign conspiracies and the death of Alexander Hamilton in a duel marked just the first twenty years of the republic even before the hurly burly of westward expansion, spoils and machine politics, sectional divisions, civil war and three dreadful financial panics repeatedly threatened national disaster. The extent to which such repeated scandals and catastrophes were understood and reacted to at least partially as corruption crises provides a framework for understanding what the Framers feared the most and how the nation was able thrive and deepen democratic traditions despite the challenges.

Registration is required. Contact the church office or OLLI@Pacific


Wednesday, April 25, 2018, 3:30 p.m.

Corruption in America Part II: The Twenty-first Century Crisis
Presenter: Gene Bigler, Retired Visiting Professor

The historical background of the first lecture provides a contrast to the scandals of the Trump Presidency suggesting how for the first time a corruption crisis may have reached the core of concern that the Framers of the Constitution feared the most. The civic virtue of the American people and their leaders was what the Framers thought would energize and safeguard their republic. The degeneration of partisan competition into tribal warfare, the only partially veiled advocacy of racist, misogynous, xenophobic and other authoritarian appeals, the neglect and repression of traditional respect for press freedoms and civic action, and the willingness to make common cause with hostile foreign interests raise the threat of corruption to the level the Framers dreaded; the widespread demise of civic virtue. The question this leaves is to what extent America’s historic responses to crisis provides some hope that the nation can overcome the evil that its founders feared the most.

Registration is required. Contact the church office or OLLI@Pacific


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